Big River Folk Art

…useful and meaningful art

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Home Carved Turnings Lazy Susans Cutting Boards and Platters Anniversary Wine Chests Events and Showings Contact ...about me
Home Carved Turnings Lazy Susans Cutting Boards and Platters Anniversary Wine Chests Events and Showings Contact ...about me

A rotating cutting board

A 14 ¼” cutting board mounted on lazy susan bearings. It’s made of Eastern Maple, a common wood used for cutting boards. The board is about 1 ½” thick and the middle is lower than the rim for holding juices.  Treated with Walnut oil and Tung oil and ready for the dinner table.

This rotating cutting board would be great for serving a small turkey, a large pot roast with some trimmings and gravy, or duck a l’ orange.

$120.00 plus tax and $17.00 shipping SOLD

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 Another rotating cutting board

A 13 ¼” cutting board on lazy susan bearings: the cutting board made from Eastern Maple and the bottom from Pecan. The middle is lower than the rim for holding au jus sauce. Treated with Walnut oil and Tung oil and ready for the dinner table.

The lazy susan mechanism on both rotating cutting boards is hidden and almost as decorative as the top.

$120.00 plus tax and $17.00 shipping

Contact me by cell phone or email from the contact page for purchase.


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A Charred Platter with an Outstanding Grain Pattern

Do a roll-over to see the decorative rim on this 14 ½” Poplar platter. The coloration is an attractive way to present your cheese and crackers or your hor o’ oeuvres.  

Notice on the thumbnail how decoratively the bottom is finished out. A great conversation piece at your next party.

Treated with Walnut oil and Tung oil and ready for the dinner table.

$95.00 plus tax and $17.00 shipping

Contact me by cell phone or email from the contact page for purchase.


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Keep with a little oil and keep the memories for a hundred years   


“Researchers have found that wood cutting-boards are less likely to harbor bacteria than plastic…” (www.rodalenews.com/natural-disinfectant?)


Wash your wooden bowl with mild dish soap after use and wipe dry immediately and rinse with some very hot water.

Big River Folk Art woodenware is finished with heat-treated walnut oil or pure Tung oil, which will eventually dry within the gain of the wood, but you can use a light treatment of mineral oil from the drug store to keep your woodenware in good condition. (I have used olive oil without problems with rancidity for years, but rancidity is a possibility with vegetable oils.) Wiping the wooden serving bowl with white vinegar before oiling will deal with bacteria and let it set for a few minutes, if that is a concern. A heavy dose of coarse salt can be added to the oil and rubbed in to scour a surface with extraneous matter, though this is not usually necessary. And the addition of salt helps with bacteria. Or, add a small amount of hydrogen peroxide 3% (from the pharmacy) for a more effective procedure for dealing with bacteria.*


After years of use, should the odor of wine or balsamic vinegar become evident, coat the surface with baking soda and let sit a day or two. Then wipe with white vinegar and oil as usual. The white vinegar will sweeten the wood. (This treatment may also help re-condition woodenware passed down through the family over the years.)


Questions or suggestions, email me: john@bigriverfolkart.com


*(Most of this information is from my research with web sites like www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. I am not an expert in bacteriology, but my personal experience has made me comfortable with the above procedures. Feel free to do your own research, because you are the one that needs to feel comfortable with your personal safety.)












































8(Most of this information is from my research with web sites like www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. I am not an expert in bacteriology, but my personal experience has made me comfortable with the above procedures. Feel free to do your own research, because you are the one that needs to feel comfortable with your personal safety.)




A Decorative Edge Framing Some Outstanding Grain

Do a roll-over with your cursor to see the decorative rim on this 13” Poplar platter. I think of ripples from a splash in a  pond when I look straight down at this platter.

The thumbnail shows the height and a glimpse at beads turned on the bottom. On all of my utilitarian treenware I treat the bottom surface as if it is as important as the top.

Treated with Walnut oil and Tung oil and ready for the dinner table.

$90.00 plus tax and $17.00 shipping

Contact me by cell phone or email from the contact page for purchase.


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Decorative Edges are in…

Do it again. Roll-over your cursor onto the picture. The edge is a random design of burned-in dots, sort of like cobble stone.

This platter is about 13” across, and treated with Walnut oil or Tung oil and ready for the dinner table.

$90.00 plus tax and $17.00 shipping

Contact me by cell phone or email from the contact page for purchase.


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